A new consortium has been formed to support the deployment of renewable technology that can produce carbon-neutral energy from previously unharnessed power. The Scottish wind energy consortium between Katrick Technologies, AGS Airports Limited (AGS) and the University of Strathclyde will enable a faster transition to clean power by exploiting low-level wind energy.

The newly-formed wind energy consortium will see the development and deployment of a new type of wind technology, created by Katrick Technologies and supported by AGS and the University of Strathclyde. This will involve the installation of Katrick Technologies’ dual-purpose wind panel and sound barrier, which can produce carbon-neutral energy from ground and low-level wind

AGS, encompassing Glasgow, Aberdeen and Southampton airports, has long been committed to carbon reduction. In 2020, the group achieved carbon neutrality status and earlier this year it launched its Sustainability Strategy which set out its commitment to achieving net zero by the mid-2030s.

Green energy

The University of Strathclyde boasts its own impressive green credentials. The University’s Sustainability team has developed a bold climate-neutral districts vision, which will see renewable technologies used across its central Scotland facilities. The team is already helping to deliver the University’s first carbon-neutral building.

Among the University of Strathclyde’s alumni is Katrick Technologies founder and Co-CEO, Karthik Velayutham. Velayutham is an accomplished renewable engineer who holds four patents for renewable technologies. He launched Katrick Technologies as a green energy start-up in 2016 and is supported by Co-CEO, Vijay Madlani, to bring these technologies to the market.

One of these technologies, which is core to the consortium, is Katrick Technologies’ dual-purpose wind panel and sound barrier, which can produce carbon-neutral energy from ground and low-level wind. These energy-harvesting wind panels have been designed to tackle the decarbonisation challenges common to both airports and highways — unlike traditional wind turbines they can capture wind power, without needing significant height or scale.

As part of the consortium, Katrick Technologies’ wind acquisition systems will be installed on the University of Strathclyde and Glasgow Airport estates. Initial wind-mapping on these sites will kick-off a phased approach for development of the wind panels. The ultimate goal is roll-out of this technology to support both estate’s net-zero goals and launch it to the wider market.

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